Randy McDonald (rfmcdpei) wrote,

[LINK] Two links on the abundance of planets in our galaxy

First, Phys.org's Marcus Woo writes about the recent claim by a team of astronomers at Caltech that red dwarf stars, the least massive and dimmest yet by far most common sort of star, are likely to have relatively extensive planetary systems. They base this claim on a detailed analysis of the system of Kepler-32, a red dwarf system charted by NASA's Kepler planet-hunting spacecraft--see its article in the Russian-language Wikipedia.

The planets orbit a star that is an M dwarf—a type that accounts for about three-quarters of all stars in the Milky Way. The five planets, which are similar in size to Earth and orbit close to their star, are also typical of the class of planets that the telescope has discovered orbiting other M dwarfs, Swift says. Therefore, the majority of planets in the galaxy probably have characteristics comparable to those of the five planets.

While this particular system may not be unique, what does set it apart is its coincidental orientation: the orbits of the planets lie in a plane that's positioned such that Kepler views the system edge-on. Due to this rare orientation, each planet blocks Kepler -32's starlight as it passes between the star and the Kepler telescope.

By analyzing changes in the star's brightness, the astronomers were able to determine the planets' characteristics, such as their sizes and orbital periods. This orientation therefore provides an opportunity to study the system in great detail—and because the planets represent the vast majority of planets that are thought to populate the galaxy, the team says, the system also can help astronomers better understand planet formation in general.

[. . .]

One of the fundamental questions regarding the origin of planets is how many of them there are. Like the Caltech group, other teams of astronomers have estimated that there is roughly one planet per star, but this is the first time researchers have made such an estimate by studying M-dwarf systems, the most numerous population of planets known.

To do that calculation, the Caltech team determined the probability that an M-dwarf system would provide Kepler-32's edge-on orientation. Combining that probability with the number of planetary systems Kepler is able to detect, the astronomers calculated that there is, on average, one planet for every one of the approximately 100 billion stars in the galaxy. But their analysis only considers planets that are in close orbits around M dwarfs—not the outer planets of an M-dwarf system, or those orbiting other kinds of stars. As a result, they say, their estimate is conservative. In fact, says Swift, a more accurate estimate that includes data from other analyses could lead to an average of two planets per star.

[. . .]

The fact that the planets in M-dwarf systems are so close to their stars doesn't necessarily mean that they're fiery, hellish worlds unsuitable for life, the astronomers say. Indeed, because M dwarfs are small and cool, their temperate zone—also known as the "habitable zone," the region where liquid water might exist—is also further inward. Even though only the outermost of Kepler-32's five planets lies in its temperate zone, many other M dwarf systems have more planets that sit right in their temperate zones.

As for how the Kepler-32 system formed, no one knows yet. But the team says its analysis places constraints on possible mechanisms. For example, the results suggest that the planets all formed farther away from the star than they are now, and migrated inward over time.


Second, James Nicoll notes at his blog claim by the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo's Planetary Habitability Laboratory that the Kepler spacecraft has identified, out of sixteen thousand possible planetary detection events, 262 potentially Earth-like worlds: "four subterrans (Mars-size), 23 terrans (Earth-size), and 235 superterrans (super Earth-size)". Comments in Nicoll's post lead to discussions pointing out that many of these identifications are preliminary and can have alternate explanations--some stars might be more variable than expected, say. Still.
Tags: extraterrestrial life, links, space science
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