Randy McDonald (rfmcdpei) wrote,

[LINK] "Build Your Own Poland"

Strange Maps' Frank Jacobs takes a look at the world of alternate history, posting a most interesting map of Poland.

The map shows a patchwork of territories in a constellation vaguely recognisable as interbellum Poland, but with added padding. These extra territories allow the respondents to decide which ones should or shouldn't become (or remain) Polish. For this map is the result of a survey among the mapmaker's peer group of allohistory buffs, and some real-world statistical analysis.

The question of the Optimal Borders Map Survey was: Which territories depicted here do you consider essential components of a Polish state?

[. . . W]hat would an ideal Poland have looked like? That depends on your definition of ideal, of course: the best borders from a military/strategic point of view? From an economic/industrial standpoint? Or should one opt for the most ethnically homogenous territory? Or perhaps choose borders grounded in the history of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth?

The end result looks like a heat map of Poland, with the cool dark greens of the central area denoting 'most optimal' Polish territories, the warmer yellows towards the periphery being 'less optimal' and the fiery reds along the edges 'least optimal'. The number in each territory is the composite score out of 10, with 0 reflecting a total rejection by all respondents, and 10 unanimous inclusion in an 'optimal Polish state'.

Arrows and a few symbols towards the edges of the map provide a few other options, all of which receive scant support, except one: Access to the sea (9.6).

The 'most optimal' territory is a large, central swathe of Poland (10.0), the 'least optimal' one is Subcarpathian Ruthenia (0.1), which has the distinction of being the tail that fell off Czechoslovakia to become an independent state for no longer than one day [9].

The biggest discrepancy between the outer borders of 'potential Poland' and the resultant 'optimal Poland' is towards the north, where northern East Prussia, Memel and most of Lithuania are coloured red, and towards the east, now part of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia respectively. What shines through, are the northern and eastern borders of interbellum Poland - give or take a plebiscited area or two.


Go to the page to see the map in question. Ingenious work.
Tags: alternate history, borders, central europe, links, maps, poland
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