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Tuesday, December 3rd, 2002
12:10a - Website To-Dos

  • Look into the templates that Allanmentioned.

  • Upload the November 2002 photos.

  • Upload the book reviews.

  • Begin to convert the term papers into HTML format for upload.



current mood: too easily distracted

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1:54a - Something I found while writing
"The bachelor and spinster, of whom there were many, were often called upon to fulfil a definite and obvious familial role. The burden of caring for aged parents and relatives most often fell to the unmarried son or daughter who not infrequently sacrificed their own ambitions to accept this responsibility. Indeed, the frequency of the unmarried farm owner was such that the minister or priest preferred to count the number of "smokes" (homes with smoke coming out of the flue) than the number of families in his charge. There were others who remained at home because they lacked the ambition and aggressiveness necessary to compete elsewhere. For the unmarried female there could be many community demands such as church and social organizations in which she would be expected to play an important role, since it was believed that she had the time to do so. Similar demands were not made on the bachelors, some of whom quickly allowed the home and property to deteriorate after the death of the parents, who were very good with promises but slowl in turning over the farm to "the boy," no matter his age. They could, however, be expected to serve as pallbearers at funerals, as scrutineers at elections, and as companions or guides on hunting and fishing expeditions. A few of them were "good on the beads." Certainly, the unmarried had definite roles in their communities though the acceptance or rejection of those roles varied with the individual."

- from D. Campbell and R.A. MacLean. Beyond the Atlantic Roar: A Study of the Nova Scotia Scots, (Toronto: McClellan and Stewart, 1974), 186-187.


current mood: thoughtful

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2:17a - Question
I'm here, writing a draft of a paper at 2:15 Atlantic Standard time, which is due to be discussed in (checks time) seven and three-quarter hours with my Honours advisor, and I'm wondering: Does anyone else put it off this late?

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9:07a - Interesting ...

What box do you get put in?

brought to you by Quizilla

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9:09a - A Proto-academic's Haiku
Many snowflakes fall
quiet outside window, paper due,
exam at two: dense time

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9:19a - Greenlandic Separatism
Greenland confronts Canadian issues

A separatist party wants a referendum and Washington is clamouring for military access


By JEFF SALLOT

Tuesday, December 3, 2002 – Page A21
Toronto Globe and Mail

Have you heard about the separatist party that says it will hold a referendum to get a mandate to negotiate independence, or sovereignty association, or something like that?

Or how about the politicians who are all in a lather because the United States wants to use a frozen chunk of the Far North for an antiballistic missile defence system?

Reruns of Canadian politics seem to be playing out next door as Canada's Arctic neighbours in Greenland hold an election today.

The Inuit Ataqatigiit (the Inuit Brotherhood) party of Greenland, like the Parti Québécois, wants to hold a referendum on independence. The IA, which is leading in a public opinion poll, says the time is coming when Greenlanders should think about cutting ties with the monarchy. In this case it is the Kingdom of Denmark.

Like the recent arms-control and NORAD debates in Canada, the big foreign-policy issue in sparsely populated Greenland these days is whether to co-operate with the Pentagon on plans for ballistic-missile defence.

The IA, a far-left socialist party, and several of the other political parties don't care much for the idea that the giant U.S. Air Force base at Thule might be modernized and converted to a radar post for the proposed missile-defence system.

Before the election campaign, a Greenland parliamentary committee insisted that the island be an equal partner with Denmark in any renegotiation of defence treaties with Washington. The MPs said they don't want to be caught in the middle of a new cold war.

The similarities with Canadian politics are so striking that there was no surprise when a caller from Ottawa rang up the Greenland newspaper last night to get the lowdown on the election, says Claus Mokuist, a political correspondent with Ag, the leading paper in Nuuk, Greenland's capital.

"Yes, it's true. Independence from Denmark is the big local issue," Mr. Mokuist said. "We may have a separatist government like your Quebec."

If the IA makes the large gains that pollsters expect, it could mean the first change in government in 23 years and could put Greenland on the road to separation. Maybe.

In order to broaden its support, the separatist party has promised that, if elected, it will not declare independence unilaterally. Rather, it will hold a referendum on the issue before May, 2005. The referendum will not be binding, but only advisory.

And then, of course, there will be negotiations with the central government in Copenhagen to establish terms for sovereignty with economic association, which is something like what Greenland has now with a form of home rule.

The HS Analysis Institute, a Danish think tank, conducted a public opinion poll recently suggesting that the IA could take up to 30 per cent of the popular vote today.

That would put it in a position to oust the governing Siumut social democratic party by forming a coalition with one of the smaller parties.

The returns should come in early, Mr. Mokuist said. There won't be that many ballots to count. Greenland has 39,000 eligible voters. It has only 57,000 people inhabiting the largest non-continental island in the world. Greenland is larger than Ontario.

Like Nunavut, Greenland's population is overwhelmingly Inuit. Greenland's aboriginal people maintain strong ties with Canadian, Russian and Alaskan cousins through the Inuit Circumpolar Conference.

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6:22p - la jour jusqu'á présent

  • Biking at 7:30 in the morning is a good experience, on the whole, particularly since it's an interesting way to wake up in the morning, particularly with coffee and good literature. Granted that I'm not likely to repeat the experiment, still.

  • I waited for Dr. MacLaine for one hour and a quarter. In the end, I left since he must not have driven up from Rice Point (a half-hour drive from the countryside) in the storm. I didn't mind this for two reasons: I have time to further refine my MacLennan essay; I had the chance to chat with Tamara at length. Tamara is an infinitely cool person, and I think I like her. I remember that Yetvushenko poem when I think of her. Hmm.

  • I met up with Jen Galle in the English Lounge at 11:30. We--and another girl who was in there; Jen, if you're reading this, do you know her name?--were talking about global politics. I find that I stand out from my peers in that while I'm critical of US foreign policy, I tend to be--perhaps--more realistic than them. There are problems with US foreign policy, but we could have worse; still more to the point, you can make a cogent case that US foreign policy problems are the result of inaction (not finishing off Saddam in 1991, opposing any strengthening of world-governance institutions) than action, at least recently.

  • Despite this disagreement, Jen and I were able to go to lunch over in the cafeteria. (Her, chips and fish; me, chicken noodle soup, a roll, a muffin, an orange juice, and a bag of Cheese Sticks [hard Cheezies].) it was there that we learned that the 2 o'clock exams were cancelled. So, no reason for me to have gone at all, biking aside.

  • I was talking about Buffy with Dr. Furlong and Jen. It was brought to our attention that Amber, Warren's sexbot from season 5, could also qualify as one of Warren's female victims. She did pass the Turing test, after all, and he did leave her to starve to death (deprived of power) in his dorm room. He was definitely a criminal sort: weak enough, and knowing he was weak enough, to be insecure about her status; powerful enough to be a threat when he tried to prove his power. He was a misogynistic young man. If anyone ever deserved Dark!Willow's unkind attentions ...

  • Jen mentioned, as we talked about Buffy, that she saw my website. (I'd E-mailed her the URL a while back, after Harry Potter.) This is tantamount to my coming out, which I'm sure she knew, particularly since we were talking about whether or not Willow was a lesbian. (I believe that she is, though I do believe based on the precedent of the very aware Vamp!Willow that she wouldn't have any objections to a heterosexual relationship with a close friend. David Bowie's right; it's confusing these days.) She said that the content was interesting, but--she quickly added--"in a good way" as we chuckled.That went nicely. No bad reactions to date.

  • I passed by Dr. Walker's office to find my HIST 391 paper, and to find that I only got a lousy 84 on it. Dammit.

  • Before I left, I passed by the computer lab to forward some papers of mine to my home address. I learned--from the same girl as who sat in the lounge--that my annotated bibliography for Dr. Pratt's Bibligoraphic research class is apparently on file as an example for students. Which is nice. I then showed her and another student some research techniques, including the INFOTrac database available free of charge to UPEI library subscribers and searching Google for PDF files. They seemed impressed. The other student in particular--is there such a thing as academic prowess impressing women?

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6:29p - Note from a colleague
An E-mail received from Peter Forbes, an acquaintance of mine from a Creative Writing seminar:

***

Hello folks;

The wonder of the electric age has enabled me to get in touch
with you all again; I'm glad I store almost every E-mail I get. I hope
you're all doing fine and have continued to be the cool people who sat
around with me and ate large amounts of chocolate and juice in Main Building
(mmm, chocolate and apple juice, together at last).
Well I'm writing to let all of you know that my other creative
endeavour, that of making music with The Rude Mechanicals, is going pretty
well and I would like to share the fruits of our labours with you. We have
two new songs that we recorded here in Toronto with the one and only Moe
Berg (The Pursuit of Happiness) and the results can be heard on our webpage,
www.therudemechanicals.pe.ca - so take a minute and listen to some new
tunes! Share them with friends if you can, we like to take advantage of this
inter-netting of computers. and i would love to hear what each and every one
of you is doing right now so don't be shy! Hope to hear from you!
Later
Peter

***

Go.

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7:18p - The Rude Mechanicals
Their two tracks, available from their website, are great. Download, buy, please.

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