Randy McDonald (rfmcdpei) wrote,
Randy McDonald
rfmcdpei

[FORUM] What was your experience of the HIV/AIDS pandemic?

This weekend has been full with recognition that 30 years previously, on the 5th of June, 1981, the first clinical description of AIDS appeared in the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report newsletter under the simple title "Pneumocystis Pneumonia - Los Angeles".

In the period October 1980-May 1981, 5 young men, all active homosexuals, were treated for biopsy-confirmed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia at 3 different hospitals in Los Angeles, California. Two of the patients died. All 5 patients had laboratory-confirmed previous or current cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and candidal mucosal infection. Case reports of these patients follow.

Patient 1: A previously healthy 33-year-old man developed P. carinii pneumonia and oral mucosal candidiasis in March 1981 after a 2-month history of fever associated with elevated liver enzymes, leukopenia, and CMV viruria. The serum complement-fixation CMV titer in October 1980 was 256; in May 1981 it was 32.* The patient's condition deteriorated despite courses of treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), pentamidine, and acyclovir. He died May 3, and postmortem examination showed residual P. carinii and CMV pneumonia, but no evidence of neoplasia.

Patient 2: A previously healthy 30-year-old man developed P. carinii pneumonia in April 1981 after a 5-month history of fever each day and of elevated liver-function tests, CMV viruria, and documented seroconversion to CMV, i.e., an acute-phase titer of 16 and a convalescent-phase titer of 28* in anticomplement immunofluorescence tests. Other features of his illness included leukopenia and mucosal candidiasis. His pneumonia responded to a course of intravenous TMP/.SMX, but, as of the latest reports, he continues to have a fever each day.

Patient 3: A 30-year-old man was well until January 1981 when he developed esophageal and oral candidiasis that responded to Amphotericin B treatment. He was hospitalized in February 1981 for P. carinii pneumonia that responded to TMP/SMX. His esophageal candidiasis recurred after the pneumonia was diagnosed, and he was again given Amphotericin B. The CMV complement-fixation titer in March 1981 was 8. Material from an esophageal biopsy was positive for CMV.

Patient 4: A 29-year-old man developed P. carinii pneumonia in February 1981. He had had Hodgkins disease 3 years earlier, but had been successfully treated with radiation therapy alone. He did not improve after being given intravenous TMP/SMX and corticosteroids and died in March. Postmortem examination showed no evidence of Hodgkins disease, but P. carinii and CMV were found in lung tissue.

Patient 5: A previously healthy 36-year-old man with clinically diagnosed CMV infection in September 1980 was seen in April 1981 because of a 4-month history of fever, dyspnea, and cough. On admission he was found to have P. carinii pneumonia, oral candidiasis, and CMV retinitis. A complement-fixation CMV titer in April 1981 was 128. The patient has been treated with 2 short courses of TMP/SMX that have been limited because of a sulfa-induced neutropenia. He is being treated for candidiasis with topical nystatin.

The diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia was confirmed for all 5 patients antemortem by closed or open lung biopsy. The patients did not know each other and had no known common contacts or knowledge of sexual partners who had had similar illnesses. The 5 reported having frequent homosexual contacts with various partners. All 5 reported using inhalant drugs, and 1 reported parenteral drug abuse. Three patients had profoundly depressed in vitro proliferative responses to mitogens and antigens. Lymphocyte studies were not performed on the other 2 patients.


This was one of the first steps towards the sudden paradigm shift necessary for medical authorities (and the general public) to recognize that, in fact, a new disease of terrible lethality could appear and in fact did appear. The retroactive classification of examples of illness and death that hadn't been classified at the time followed, as did the knowledge that many new cases and fatalities were coming--25 million deaths so far--without anything obvious that could be done to save the tens of millions infected with HIV. The situation has improved very substantially with the development of effective antiretroviral drugs and the combination therapies which allow people infected with HIV. It's still an ongoing horror.

My encounters with HIV/AIDS haven't been first-hand so much as second-hand, negative imprints of one kind or another: age groups oddly depleted, psychological wounds left, a literature and a music and every other element of culture left branded. My particular demographic affiliations aside (I twitch habitually, so no change there), it's been nothing like that of others I know of who lived in the 1980s and the first half of the 1990s. The grace of late birth is something I appreciate.

That's my experience. And yours?
Tags: forums, hiv/aids, non blog, popular culture
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